IMPOSED KOSOVO SOLUTION BAD FOR ISRAEL, BAD FOR AMERICA, BAD FOR NATION-STATE

Published on December 7, 2007, American Council for Kosovo

Category: News from the American Council for Kosovo

Anti-Separatist Opinion Grows Worldwide
EU: Corruption Rampant; KLA Violence in FYROM

Editorial Comment from the American Council for Kosovo The amount of commentary being generated worldwide calling for a new look at the Kosovo problem and warning against the disaster that would surely unfold if Kosovo were forcibly and illegally separated from Serbia is growing faster than we can keep track of it. This means that the glacier of inertia and misrepresentation in which U.S. policy has been frozen for almost a decade is cracking. What had been a trickle of serious analysis taking issue with the State Departments policy has turned into a steady stream.

Case in point: Of all of Americas closest friends and allies, the one with the most experience combating jihad terror is Israel. If the light bulb has yet to go on in Washington that U.S. sponsorship of Muslim-only jihad states is a bad idea whether in Palestine or Kosovo it certainly is in Jerusalem. Writing in the Jerusalem Post, one of Israel's most influential commentators Caroline Glick puts two and two together and, unlike our State Department, gets four:

The Saudi-financed Kosovo Muslims have destroyed more than 150 churches over the past several years, and have terrorized Kosovar Christians and so led to their mass exodus from the province. Kosovos connections with Albanian criminal syndicates and global jihadists are legion. Moreover, Kosovar independence would likely spur irredentist movements among the Muslim minorities in all Balkan states. In Macedonia for instance, a quarter of the population is Muslim. These irredentist movements in turn would increase Muslim irredentism throughout Europe just as Palestinian statehood will foment an intensification of the Islamization of Israel's Arab minority. In a bid both to prevent the Bush administration from turning on Israel in the aftermath of the failure of the Annapolis conference and to make clear Israel's own rejection of the notion that a solution to the Palestinian conflict with Israel can be imposed by foreign powers, the Olmert government should immediately and loudly restate its opposition to the imposition of Kosovar independence on Serbia. In the interest of defending the nation-state system, on which American sovereignty and foreign policy is based, the US should reassess the logic of its support for the establishment of Muslim-only states. It should similarly revisit its refusal to openly support the right of non-Islamic states like Israel, Serbia and even France, to assert their rights to defend their sovereignty, national security and national character from outside-sponsored domestic Islamic subversion.

Not only in Israel, but across the United States, on college campus, and among our European allies, awareness is growing that if Washington carries out its threat to recognize a unilateral declaration of independence by the terrorists and criminals that run the Albanian Muslim administration in Kosovo, the result would be chaos in the international system and a humanitarian and human rights disaster. Recently the European Union which is slated to take over the mission in Kosovo botched by the United Nations released a scathing report on corruption and human rights abuses in Kosovo under the authorities aspiring to become the government of a new, independent country. Meanwhile, in the next-door Former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia, police tracked down and killed members of a terrorist/criminal gang, an indication of the destabilization that already has spilled over from Kosovo and would greatly intensify if their cronies in Kosovo are awarded de jure power.

As Washington tries to round up support for its endgame after December 10 (the date the U.S./EU/Russia Troika is due to report to the UN Secretary-General on their effort), growing awareness of the true situation in Kosovo is pushing Europe in the opposite direction. Romania will not be among the first ten countries to recognize it [Kosovo], said Foreign Minister Adrian Cioroianu, nor will Romania be part of the next ten. Instead of pushing our friends and allies around the world toward a course they dont want and would be injurious to their interests, Washington needs to take a step back now.

Meanwhile, as more Americans and friends of America catch on to what the State Department is trying to do, more cracks appear, and the ice is ready to shatter.

James George Jatras
Director, American Council for Kosovo


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